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Thread: SMN: Next GSU President Must Embrace Armstrong

  1. #111

    Default Re: SMN: Next GSU President Must Embrace Armstrong

    Quote Originally Posted by pete4256 View Post
    I wouldn't say that. I would say that we are unanimous in wanting our children to get the best education(s) possible.

    And we're almost unanimous in wanting American children to get the best education(s) possible.
    I was referring to the opposition to the "No Child Left Behind" mentality in education. That seems to be universally despised by everyone outside Washington, D.C.

    One thing I've told students that I have tutored and taught is that you can't think of your mind of a gas tank waiting to be filled up by teachers and professors. It's more like a blender, and people will give you the ingredients but you have to do the work to integrate and organize the information into a usable form and practicing that skill might be the most important thing to learn. That's a lesson IMO that is lost.
    Don't choose to be annoyed. Choose to be amused.

    If you think TK is the reason we don't have better non-conference football schedules, see this post.

  2. #112

    Default Re: SMN: Next GSU President Must Embrace Armstrong

    Quote Originally Posted by pete4256 View Post
    I wouldn't say that. I would say that we are unanimous in wanting our children to get the best education(s) possible.

    And we're almost unanimous in wanting American children to get the best education(s) possible.

    Beyond that, I see a lot of anecdotes and simplistic ideology in this thread that I could take issue with. What's the point, though? There's no chance for a productive conversation here. Maybe over a beer sometime.

    I do challenge everyone to do some reading/thinking about how poverty affects education. Regardless of your background, if you had parents who fed you, made you go to bed at night, ensured that you went to school every day, and cared about your academic performance, thank them. You were blessed in ways that many American children are not.
    No doubt the factors you note in your last paragraph are tremendous influences on educational-as well as life-outcomes. I count my blessings every single day that when it came time for my number to be called and my soul rolled down the chute from the assembly line I was fortunate enough to pop out into a loving and committed family in a free and prosperous country. I think there would indeed be almost universal agreement on this point. The points at which opinions would likely tend to diverge on the subject would be the automatic association of poverty with the lack of the above and the perspective on the respective associations with which of these (poverty vs. lack of nurturing family structure) is cause and which is effect-and consequently what is the best way to address/improve the problem(s).

    Although the two may be proven to be strongly correlated from a statistical standpoint, there is nothing inherently mutually exclusive between poverty stricken on the one hand and maintaining a nurturing (emotionally and culturally if not financially) family structure on the other, as evidenced at least anecdotally by 1peat's reference. This suggests that what we have is a cultural issue, and that a cultural shift is the solution - to the problems of both poverty and family structure (and consequently educational and life outcomes). We have cultural pockets in communities of all ethnic stripes that value neither family structure nor educational attainment, or even the virtue of staying out of jail for that matter ... which then begs the questions: how do you effect a cultural paradigm shift? Is it possible to direct it by the use of external levers? Can more spending accomplish it? How quickly an it be accomplished (won't it take at least a generation?) What can be done while it happens to ameliorate the symptoms in the meantime without unintentionally subverting the process?

    All heavy lifting, these questions, and the answers are probably a lot more nuanced than just throwing money at it OR pretending it's not our problem.

  3. #113

    Default Re: SMN: Next GSU President Must Embrace Armstrong

    One of my neighbors is a police officer. He said he's actually had to go on calls where someone called the cops because their kid wouldn't go to school. He said he told one lady, "Ma'am, I can't do anything to him but I've got a belt you can use and I'll stand here while YOU whup his *** and make him go to school."

  4. #114

    Default Re: SMN: Next GSU President Must Embrace Armstrong

    Quote Originally Posted by yourmother View Post
    One of my neighbors is a police officer. He said he's actually had to go on calls where someone called the cops because their kid wouldn't go to school. He said he told one lady, "Ma'am, I can't do anything to him but I've got a belt you can use and I'll stand here while YOU whup his *** and make him go to school."
    True story. The night before my dad died, I was with him and mom for dinner. After dinner(dad not in good health), he was resting in his recliner, eyes closed and we were quietly talking. Dad said, "you know son, ive always tried to be a good dad...., was there any mistakes I made or could I have done something differently?" I thought for a min., thinking about our past(dad had his eyes closed), I said,"there was one time dad, the time in high school where my grades were terrible, Dad, you should have yanked me off the baseball team and told me, no baseball till the grades come up". He opened his eyes and said, "son, I just couldn't do that, I knew how much you loved baseball". Other than giving him a kiss on the cheek and telling him "good night, I love you and I'll be here at 5:00 AM to take you down to the VA(Dad wanted to check into the VA the following AM), that was the last conversation I had with him. He passed away a little before 5 the next AM, at home. I can remember it like it was yesterday.

  5. #115

    Default Re: SMN: Next GSU President Must Embrace Armstrong

    Quote Originally Posted by garns 4 View Post
    True story. The night before my dad died, I was with him and mom for dinner. After dinner(dad not in good health), he was resting in his recliner, eyes closed and we were quietly talking. Dad said, "you know son, ive always tried to be a good dad...., was there any mistakes I made or could I have done something differently?" I thought for a min., thinking about our past(dad had his eyes closed), I said,"there was one time dad, the time in high school where my grades were terrible, Dad, you should have yanked me off the baseball team and told me, no baseball till the grades come up". He opened his eyes and said, "son, I just couldn't do that, I knew how much you loved baseball". Other than giving him a kiss on the cheek and telling him "good night, I love you and I'll be here at 5:00 AM to take you down to the VA(Dad wanted to check into the VA the following AM), that was the last conversation I had with him. He passed away a little before 5 the next AM, at home. I can remember it like it was yesterday.
    When I was in middle school, a previous coach of mine recruited me to play on a travel team in addition to my normal baseball team.

    Two weeks into it, I got some bad grades on my report card and my dad said he'd pull me off the new team if the grades didn't improve. I didn't believe him because I knew he loved watching me play. Fast forward a couple of weeks and a report that I had blown off an assignment and he proved me wrong. He made me personally call my coach and tell him exactly why I wouldn't be playing for him. Then he marched me to the bleachers where I watched - but didn't play - the next few games for my original team.

    My grades got better after that.
    The thoughts and opinions discussed in this post are property of CC Eagle and should not be redistributed or retransmitted without the express written consent of Major League Baseball.

  6. #116
    Join Date
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    Default Re: SMN: Next GSU President Must Embrace Armstrong

    That is great parenting. My boys got super grades and played 3 different sports, went well until the divorce. Went downhill quickly because of two different styles of discipline and directions. Boys told me the same thing years later, but PTO in the end they remembered their earlier life. I believe parenting is more important than where they begin school.

  7. #117

    Default Re: SMN: Next GSU President Must Embrace Armstrong

    Quote Originally Posted by CC Eagle View Post
    When I was in middle school, a previous coach of mine recruited me to play on a travel team in addition to my normal baseball team.

    Two weeks into it, I got some bad grades on my report card and my dad said he'd pull me off the new team if the grades didn't improve. I didn't believe him because I knew he loved watching me play. Fast forward a couple of weeks and a report that I had blown off an assignment and he proved me wrong. He made me personally call my coach and tell him exactly why I wouldn't be playing for him. Then he marched me to the bleachers where I watched - but didn't play - the next few games for my original team.

    My grades got better after that.
    +1

  8. #118
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Warner Robins, GA
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    24,682

    Default Re: SMN: Next GSU President Must Embrace Armstrong

    Talking about tough love......




    If that's the level of accountability players are being held to, Lunsford has a very high level of respect from the team.


  9. Default Re: SMN: Next GSU President Must Embrace Armstrong

    Quote Originally Posted by pete4256 View Post
    I'm not sure why all graduates should be expected to know anything about Zola. I mean, he's (at best) a Tier 1B nineteenth-century French novelist.

    Naturalism itself is an important concept in the history of ideas, but it can be easily taught in other contexts, studying, for instance, the various kinds of late nineteenth-century determinism: dialectical materialism, Darwinism, early psychoanalysis, etc.

    If knowing about naturalist fiction is crucial to cultural literacy, however, American students can learn about it much more easily by reading Stephen Crane in American Lit.

    Maggie, a Girl of the Streets is much easier to read than, say, Germinal. And the aforementioned determinism(s) can be more efficiently learnt from Jack London or even from H.G. Wells than from Zola or a British naturalist novelist like George Gissing.

    Anyway, if HS or college students had to read one nineteenth-century French novelist, it (sh/w)ould not be Zola. It would be either Flaubert or Balzac. AFAIK, it's a moot point anyway, as there's no comparative literature class organized along historical lines in HS--just American and British Lit. Nor am I aware of too many college World Lit courses in which Zola makes the cut.

    This, of course, assumes that cultural literacy/history is a worthwhile pursuit. Sigh.
    19th Century French literature... Meh. Voltaire crushes them. then again, I also prefer Camus to any 19th Century French writer. So there's that.

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