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Thread: Where did GATA originate?

  1. #31

    Default Re: Where did GATA originate?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bojangles View Post
    If we're on the topic of Erkisms, what does FIDO stand for?
    F--- it and drive on.

  2. #32

    Default Re: Where did GATA originate?

    Thanks for sharing that story. I've never heard any of that before.

  3. #33

    Default Re: Where did GATA originate?

    Quote Originally Posted by JRConley View Post
    Thanks for sharing that story. I've never heard any of that before.
    Reading Erk's book and watching the the old video about him, and the championship videos should be a requirement for all Freshman or at least count as some sort of University History elective credit.

    I think it would go a long way towards getting our students to understand what it means to be an Eagle, and do a lot for helping them embrace THEIR University and attend events while raking in the complete College experience. JMHOP.

  4. Default Re: Where did GATA originate?

    Last edited by GSU25+yrFan; 14th August 2014 at 06:12 AM.
    "I believe political correctness is one of the most dangerous movements facing America." Erk Russell

  5. #35

    Default Re: Where did GATA originate?

    Erk also wore that thread bear GATA t-shirt at the '89 NC game. just before the team went to the locker room after pre-game warm-up he took off his sweat shirt to reveal the old gray t-shirt with GATA in dark blue letters. the players responded in a way I'm sure you can imagine. SFA didn't have a chance.

  6. #36

    Default Re: Where did GATA originate?

    Quote Originally Posted by EAGLEX2 View Post
    Erk also wore that thread bear GATA t-shirt at the '89 NC game. just before the team went to the locker room after pre-game warm-up he took off his sweat shirt to reveal the old gray t-shirt with GATA in dark blue letters. the players responded in a way I'm sure you can imagine. SFA didn't have a chance.
    That was the original "ONE MORE TIME" shirt he wore. I don't know why everyone thinks it was the GATA shirt, but you're not alone in thinking that.

  7. #37

    Default Re: Where did GATA originate?

    Quote Originally Posted by StingingEagle View Post
    Not to take away from the thread, but is "Do Right" one of his "Erkisms"? I know Paul Johnson is big on that, but I read someone that is started with Erk...
    Yes that was ERK. "I have only one rule, Do Right".

  8. #38

    Default Re: Where did GATA originate?

    The Oxford World Dictionary just added a few new words but GATA eas not one of them.. Shame on them.

  9. #39
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JRConley View Post
    Thanks for sharing that story. I've never heard any of that before.
    Before the fall quarter must have been fall '83, three of my fraternity brothers heard there was a huge party at the quads at Clemson after a few beers we decided we needed to be there. So off to Johnson's we go to pick up a keg for the trip. Football Practice must have just ended as Coach Russell was at Johnson's picking up his "peanuts" Coach Russell watched us for about 5 minutes stuff this full keg and ice can into the back seat of the car. He walked over and asked us what we were doing, we told him about the trip, he said "Clemson, huh, you know those folks can be pretty nasty, but at least that keg will be easier to unload when you get back, y'all be careful boys"
    "Did we give up when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor?... No, Who is with me?" Bluto

    "We'll win one we should have lost, and lose one we should have won, surprise a OOC FBS opponent or two, win the SBC Championship and get our second bowl win" Me

  10. Default Re: Where did GATA originate?

    Erk's quotes never get old:

    I was taught better at home than to be disrespectful to anybody.

    I was a pretty good kid, I really didn't get into too much trouble. On one occasion, just after school, a group of boys met in the boys bathroom and somebody was rolling dice. ... I remember I stepped in and said, "My turn," and I put a dime down there and my point was 10. ... I was saying, "Come on 10, come on 10," and I looked around all of a sudden and there was nobody there. And I turned all the way around and our shop teacher, Mr. Sparks, said, "Come on, Russell." ... I learned a good lesson: Don't try to make 10.

    My dad always had a job that he really didn't relish getting up and going to every day. He said, "Boy" - that's all he ever called me - he said, "Boy, you do something that you enjoy doing."

    I had an opportunity (to play) at Alabama. I told them that that was what I always wanted to do and that I was coming, and when I got back home an Auburn coach was sitting on my front porch, and he said, "Come on, we're going to Auburn." And I said, "I just got back from Alabama, I told them I was gonna go to school there and that's what I want to do." And he said, "Well you've got to take a look at Auburn." So I said, "OK." We drove to Auburn, he put on a change of clothes, picked up his bag and we went to Gulf Shores, Alabama, and fished for two days. When we got back, I said, "I've always wanted to go to Auburn."

    I started out in the school of business. The first or second quarter that I was there I took accounting and I said, "I don't believe this is for me."
    Attitude might be worth 80 percent of any athlete's makeup.

    We had a group of about eight boys in the Navy, all from the South - South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Mississippi. In the barracks we took the corner, drew a line, said, "No Yankees" across this. We didn't really mean it, but they thought we did.

    I believe political correctness is one of the most dangerous movements facing America.
    You know what a consultant is, don't you? A consultant is a guy that knows 100 different sex positions but doesn't know a woman.

    The South, to me, is fried chicken and catfish caviar - that's grits - and good-looking women.

    Communication is the most important technique in teaching and in coaching, eyeball to eyeball, one on one: "This is what we want to accomplish, and this is the way we're going to accomplish it." Not memos, not bulletin boards or announcements, one on one.

    The brotherhood of football ... is the strongest brotherhood known to man as far as I'm concerned.

    I had a handmade card hanging in my locker at Georgia that said, "If I do, they will. If I don't, they won't."

    We lost a 3-year-old at one time, a child, and that is real pain. But time, blessed time, is the greatest healer. ... It ain't gonna quit hurting until enough time passes.

    I was inducted into the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame - 500 people in a big room - and a man with a roving microphone stuck it in front of my wife and said, "How did a nice-looking lady like you live with this old bald-headed so and so for so many years?" And without blinking she said, "He was never at home."

    I have very little use for cell phones ... but they seem to be free on the weekends.

    Our recruiting budget at Georgia Southern was $200 our first year. I had just left Georgia, whose recruiting budget was a quarter of a million dollars. And as I drove down the Woodpecker Trail, trying to touch base with people in Claxton and Alma and Jesup and Ludowici, sometimes I wondered, "What have you done?"

    In the interest of economy, we had plain white paints, we had plain navy-blue shirts, a number on the front and a number on the back. We couldn't even put a stripe down the middle of our helmets. We used a strip of tape. ... Those kind of things screamed, "Team."

    I wouldn't allow them to put names on the back of our jerseys. We had to sell programs.

    Probably the most historical figure in Alabama history is Bear Bryant. I wish I had his coaching ability and his record and his financial statement.

    The 1980 season at Georgia, I came out of the dormitory where we ate our pregame meal. I looked down and there was a dime on the ground. I picked it up, put it in my left shoe. I was wearing saddle Oxfords, which I did all the time anyway, and we beat Clemson that day, maybe it was the second or third game of the season. I taped the dime in my shoe so I wouldn't lose it, and made sure that I wore it throughout the season. We were 12-0 and won the national championship, and I'm sure the dime did it.

    We had a president that came to Georgia Southern and during one of our booster luncheons to kick off the football season - he's the new president, his name was Nick Henry. ... He got up before the group and said, "It's so nice to be at a college that's not on probation." He said, "I taught at Georgia, they were on probation. I went to Arizona State, they were on probation." ... I followed him with my remarks and I said, "Dr. Henry, you don't have to worry about Georgia Southern cheating. Because it takes money to cheat, and we don't have any money."

    A good story just makes you feel better.

    If you don't have the best of everything, make the best of everything you have.

    The best way to win a game is not to lose it.

    I haven't been very smart, but what I have been is lucky. Somebody asked me about the last year that I coached at Southern, "What would I like for people to say about me after I'm gone?" And I told them, "I would like for them to say, 'He was the luckiest S.O.B. that I've ever seen.' " And I have been that. Smart? No. No way.

    As a young coach, I ran with the players. As a 55-year-old coach, I jogged with the players. As an old coach of 60, 64, 65, I had to start woggin'. A wog is a little bit faster than a walk, but slower than a jog.

    I've had both hips replaced. I've had surgery on every joint except one knee and one elbow. I've had my left knee replaced. Compared to a knee, a hip replacement is a piece of cake.

    I think most golfers would just about swap their front-row seat in hell for 30 more yards off the tee.
    After the 40th year of coaching, I'd walk around the field with my hands in my pockets. The less I said and did, the better our teams performed. I said, "This ain't coaching. It's time for me to hang it up."

    People ask me, "Do you miss coaching?" And my reply is, "Every day that rolls around."

    I don't particularly miss going to see a young man, telling him how great our school is, and what an opportunity he has here, and mean every word of it. And then have him say, "Coach, I just ain't made up my mind yet."

    Fame wasn't important. I didn't even know it existed. I saw my name in the paper and my picture in the paper a lot, but I felt like I could overcome that.

    A good sense of humor even helps in football.
    "I believe political correctness is one of the most dangerous movements facing America." Erk Russell

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